fbpx

Do you know the Three Es of IPM?

Do you know the Three Es of IPM?

Do you know the Three Es of IPM?

Do you know the Three Es of IPM?

IPM is the Three Es

  • Effectiveness (how well does the method work?)
  • Economics (how much does the management cost?)
  • Environment (including non-target organisms)

All pest management systems are a balance of these three. Both the effectiveness of operations and the environmental considerations should be more important than the economics of any operation. However, as in any business activity, keeping costs down is always an important factor.

Assessment

The basis of IPM is the correct assessment of existing pest pressures and forecasting future pest problems in a given situation. Assessment is based upon a suitable pest survey, correct identification of pest species, practical knowledge of pest biology and behavior, and both the effectiveness and risks associated with all the available control methods.

To carry out an assessment, there must be an understanding of the relationship between hazard and risk.

Hazard is the potential to cause harm. Harm can be a skin rash, a cough, or in extreme cases, death. Risk is the likelihood that the hazard will actually cause harm.

Assessment

  1. Assess the scope of the problem by conducting a survey of the facility.
    A preliminary inspection for pests and signs of pest activity is usually followed by the use of monitoring traps to estimate the pest population type and density.
  2. Assess whether the problem can be solved by appropriate sanitation. Appropriate master cleaning schedules and actionable items to exclude pest harborages (food, water, and space) are often the most effective methods, and usually the least environmentally intrusive or hazardous to people.
  3. Assess if the problem can be solved by other non-chemical methods. Climate management and proofing-against (exclusion) or trapping of pest invaders should be considered before resorting to chemical control.
  4. If the problem cannot be solved by nonchemical methods the most suitable pesticide must be assessed.
    Products should be chosen to combine a high level of management with a minimal acceptable risk to people or property. Choice of product includes a properly labelled pesticide, the most suitable formulation, and the best application technique.
  5. Assess post-treatment actions to reduce involuntary exposures and risk to the environment.
    Consider who needs to be warned about any actions either at the point of application or adjacent areas. Decide if and when to return to remove and/or destroy baits etc. Follow all product label and regulatory requirements.
  6. Assess whether further monitoring or treatments are necessary. Sustainable pest solutions always involve continuous monitoring. No control method lasts forever. Repeat visits should be scheduled at this stage.

For more details, please reference to the training manual.

Do you know the Three Es of IPM?
Translate »
EnglishGermanSpainFrenchItalyDutchChinaPolandRussiaUSAAustralia