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What you need to know about choosing insect light traps

Dr. Mitchell continues the Focus on the Fly series with insights on choosing the right insect light trap.

The phototactic behavior of insects has been well recognized for a long time; for example, humans used fires to attract insect pests in ancient times. In the past few decades, scientists have studied the nature and mechanism of phototactic behavior in insects, and traps equipped with specific light sources have been applied in practice. However, the reason for phototactic behavior in insects remains unclear and physical pest control requires effective and practical light traps1.

The principle of a light trap is based on the positive phototactic behavior of insects towards light emitted from the trap. Many light traps have been developed and used to monitor and control phototactic insect pests in IPM1.

(A line of sight deployment of insect light traps at a manufacturing facility)

When determining the best insect light trap for the service, it is essential to understand the environment in which the trap will be operational. Choose correctly or loose optimum flying insect captures.

A thorough understanding of the environment to be protected can be obtained with a facility survey. To properly conduct the survey, determine which facility representative will accompany you on the survey (ideally a senior manager or quality assurance representative). During initial survey of the facility, the purpose is to obtain information, not provide premature recommendations. Use a note pad and pen to record observations.

Filth flies are more active during the day, and the photoperiod most flies will be caught. Observation and documentation of filth fly flight paths helps to determine best insect light trap (ILT) and electronic fly killer (EFK) placements and timely replacements. ILT and EFK placement height does not matter as long as line-of-sight is maintained. The key to pest prevention and management is early detection through the use of more ILTs and EFKs.

Filth flies are more active during the day, and the photoperiod most flies will be caught. Observation and documentation of filth fly flight paths helps to determine best insect light trap (ILT) and electronic fly killer (EFK) placements and timely replacements. ILT and EFK placement height does not matter as long as line-of-sight is maintained. The key to pest prevention and management is early detection through the use of more ILTs and EFKs.

References:
Kil-Nam Kim, Qiu-Ying Huanga, and Chao-Liang Leia, Advances in insect phototaxis and application to pest management: a review. Pest Management Science 2019; 75: 3135–3143, wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/ps, © 2019 Society of Chemical Industry.
Granovsky, T et al.

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